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   Celtic Paganism is a polytheistic spiritual belief system revisiting the Ancient Pagan Celtic Religion. The Celts occupied different parts of Europe from France to the British Isles. While each region was similar, many areas had different customs and different gods. In modern times Celtic Pagans can focus on one region like Ireland and Scotland gods or Wales and Cornwall or they can choose to follow the entirety as an Eclectic Celtic Pagan. Celtic Reconstructionist choose to emphasize historical accuracy over eclecticism. The Religion as a whole is based around the Mythology, historical records and archaeological reports of what is known of the Celtic Culture.

 

   As you can see Celtic Paganism is as much of an umbrella term as general paganism is within itself. We can practice by ourselves or with a group. Our groups are generally called “Hearths” or “Groves,” however the term “grove” is usually reserved for official druid groups. Druids are very much apart of Celtic culture. Most druid organizations will take what little information we have about historical druids and add various ideals to fill in the gaps to create a structured tradition. These druid organizations can vary in beliefs and practices as much as Celtic Paganism itself can.

As part of our cultural studies we try to speak and learn the modern native language associated with our area of focus. These languages are

 

Celtic/ Gaelic Languages:

Breton: Spoken in south-western Brittany and part of modern day France. The only surviving language of the Continental Celts

Cornish: Once extinct language but being revived spoken in Cornwall

Gaelic: Spoken in Scotland

Irish: Spoken in Ireland

Manx: Spoken on the Isle of Man

Welsh: Spoke in Wales

 

The Gods

As mentioned throughout this website, we work with and study Irish Mythology. Within, there is numerous deities and heroes we honor and read stories about. This list is by far not complete but is a good reference point for Irish Celtic study. These are specifically the Gaelic deities.   

The Trinity Gods of Skill of the Tuatha Dé Danann

  • An Dagda

  • Lugh Lámfada

  • Ogma

Trinity Guises of Goddess An Mórrígan

  • Badb

  • Macha

  • Nemain

 

 

The Trinity Gods of Smith Craft  of the Tuatha Dé Danann

  • Goibniu  ..................................God of blacksmithing and brewing

  • Creidhne  ................................God of goldsmithing, brass and bronze

  • Luchtaine  ..............................God of carpentry

The Tuatha Dé Danann

  • Abcán  .....................................Dwarf poet and musician

  • Aengus Óg  ............................God of youth, love, poetry & summer

  • Ai Mac Ollamain  ...............God of poetry

  • Áine  .........................................Goddess of summer/ sun, wealth & sovereignty

  • Airmed  ...................................Goddess of healing and herbalism

  • Beag  .........................................Goddess of wisdom and over a magick well

  • Brigid  ......................................Goddess of poets, a healer and crafts

  • Caer Ibormeith  ....................Goddess of Dreams and Prophecy                 

  • Cían  .......................................God of enduring. The physician

  • Dian Cécht  ...........................God of health

  • Ecne  .......................................God of Wisdom & Knowledge

  • Ernmas  ...................................Mother Goddess

  • Étaín  ........................................Goddess of the Sun, passion and horses

  • Flidais  .....................................Goddess of cattle and fertility

  • Fúamnach  .............................Goddess of knowledge

  • Néit  .........................................God of War

  • Nuada  ....................................First king. God of light and justice

  • Sínann  ....................................Goddess of the River Shannon

Other Gods & Heroes

  • Béḃinn  ..................................Goddess of birth living in Mag Mell

  • Cailleach Beara  ................Goddess of winter & Storms/ divine hag

  • Cú Chulainn  ......................Demi-God son of Lugh

  • Fionn mac Cumhaill  ......Human hero of the Fenian Cycle

  • Lén  .......................................The Craftsman who lives at Loch Léin

  • Manannán mac Lir  .........God of the Irish Sea. Guardian of the Otherworld

  • Mongfhionn  .......................Goddess worshipped on Samhain/ A Banshee

  • Tailtiu  ....................................Goddess of the harvest, warriors and skill

  • Tlachtga  ...............................Goddess worshipped on Samhain/ a druidess

  • Donn Cúailnge, the Brown Bull of Cooley (Friuch)

  • Finnbhennach "white-horned" The White Bull

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Holidays & Feast Days

Just like any other religion we also have our holidays and holy days. There are 4 main holidays in the Irish Celtic tradition that have been celebrated since the time of antiquity. Then there are other celebrations known as “Feast Days.” Some of these have become a modern reconstruction because we don't have a written source for them but it is believed that some of these Feast Days were celebrated, so they can vary from group to group.

Samhain. (pronounced: Sah-win) October 31st

The name translates to “Summers End” and is the actual name in Irish for November. It marks the beginning and end of the year. The start of the dark half of the year. One of the major fire festivals and the last of the 3 harvest festivals. A time to honor the dead and the ancestors. The Aos Sí (often referred to as spirits or fairies) were thought to be especially active at this time because the veil between this world and the Otherworld was thinnest.

Imbolc Febuary 1st

The word “Imbolc” means “in the belly” which indicates pregnancy and the fertilization of the land. It marked the beginning of spring and warmer days. The goddess Brigid was celebrated at this time it was known as her day

Bealtaine (pronounced: Bee-yel-tin-ah) May 1st

The beginning of the light half of the year. A major fire festival celebrating the fertility of the land. There were rituals to protect cattle, people and crops. It was a time of marriage and the birth of the land. The Aos Sí (often referred to as spirits or fairies) were thought to be especially active at this time because the veil between this world and the Otherworld was thinnest.

Lúnasa or Lughnasadh (pronounced: loo-na-sah) August 1st

The start of the harvest season. It is the time we observe the days growing shorter as we approach the waning half of the year. Lúnasa in Irish is the name for August which name is derived from the name of the Celtic God Lugh and nása, which means assembly. The Goddess Tailtiu (Tal-choo), stepmother of Lugh was also a master of all arts and she is said to have died of exhaustion after clearing the plains for agriculture. Lugh established the first harvest festival and funeral games in her honor. He named it Áenach Tailteann (on-ak tal-choo-an)

Feast Days

  • January 6th : Feast of An Mórrígan

  • February 14th : Feast of Aengus Óg

  • March 17th: Crom Earrach/ CúChulainn

  • June 9th : Feast of Fionn MacCumhaill

  • June 21st : Summer Solstice Feast of Manannán mac Lir

  • July 31st : Feast of Macha

  • September 21st : Corra Fomhar

  • December 6th : Feast of Goibniu

  • December 20th : Feast of Cailleach Beara

  • December 21st: Winter Solstice Feast of An Dagda 

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